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Sugar Overload

IN ADVANCE:

Review the Sugar Overload Activity in the curriculum. This prop is meant to pair with this activity and ease the delivery by minimizing mess.

DURING CLASS

1. ASK: What types of drinks or yogurts do you usually buy? What nutrients do we want (calcium, vitamins) from these items? What might we want to limit (sugar, fat) when consuming these items?

2. Pass out a beverage and yogurt container to each participant (or participant pairs). Ask participants to use the containers’ nutrition fact labels to examine sugar content.

3. SHARE: Four grams of sugar is approximately 1 teaspoon of sugar, the same amount as one packet of sugar.

4. Remind participants to check the serving size of each container.

5. ASK: Is anyone surprised by their serving size?

6. Have participants to share their container’s sugar content with the group while you demonstrate the corresponding sugar packet visual.

7. ASK: Is anyone surprised by the total sugar content in their container?

8. SHARE: Bring attention to the apple juice, point out that while it is naturally occurring sugar, sugar is processed the same way in the body regardless of source – you are missing the fiber whole apples provide when drinking juice.

9. ASK: Are there ways that we can reduce our sugar intake from beverages and yogurt without completely avoiding sugar?

10. SHARE: Dilute fruit juices with sparkling water, drink one (or more) fewer sugar beverages each day, mix plain yogurt with sweetened yogurt, sweeten plain yogurt with fruit, honey, etc.


Return to Lesson Enhancements and Visual Aids

Sugar Overload

IN ADVANCE:

Review the Sugar Overload Activity in the curriculum. This prop is meant to pair with this activity and ease the delivery by minimizing mess.

DURING CLASS

1. ASK: What types of drinks or yogurts do you usually buy? What nutrients do we want (calcium, vitamins) from these items? What might we want to limit (sugar, fat) when consuming these items?

2. Pass out a beverage and yogurt container to each participant (or participant pairs). Ask participants to use the containers’ nutrition fact labels to examine sugar content.

3. SHARE: Four grams of sugar is approximately 1 teaspoon of sugar, the same amount as one packet of sugar.

4. Remind participants to check the serving size of each container.

5. ASK: Is anyone surprised by their serving size?

6. Have participants to share their container’s sugar content with the group while you demonstrate the corresponding sugar packet visual.

7. ASK: Is anyone surprised by the total sugar content in their container?

8. SHARE: Bring attention to the apple juice, point out that while it is naturally occurring sugar, sugar is processed the same way in the body regardless of source – you are missing the fiber whole apples provide when drinking juice.

9. ASK: Are there ways that we can reduce our sugar intake from beverages and yogurt without completely avoiding sugar?

10. SHARE: Dilute fruit juices with sparkling water, drink one (or more) fewer sugar beverages each day, mix plain yogurt with sweetened yogurt, sweeten plain yogurt with fruit, honey, etc.


Return to Lesson Enhancements and Visual Aids

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